News

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How to show a local forecast on your web site

We've recently introduced a number of sharing panels that you can use to show a local wind and wave forecast on your own web site. To include a panel on your site all you need to do is follow these simple steps:

Visit http://www.crossoff.net/sharing/panel

Share a local forecast on your site

Select the panel you want to use and click on "Use panel showing today's forecast"

Share a local forecast on your site

Choose the country and spot that you want to show the forecast for

Share a local forecast on your site

Copy and paste the code provided into your own site

Share a local forecast on your site

That's it.

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cross.off ratings are changing

Until now, the cross.off ratings have been focused on wind. The ratings are now evolving to take into consideration likely wave conditions at each spot. Look out for a red outline to each star to indicate likely wave quality - for now we’re basing on the wave rating on a mix of swell height and swell period, but in the future we’ll look at adding in swell direction.

Get the full breakdown of the rating system

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Jet Stream forecasts now available

The jet stream has a strong influence in the weather conditions experienced across the globe, but particularly for the UK and Northern Europe.

What is the jet stream?

Jet streams are narrow, fast moving air currents found in the higher atmosphere flowing from West to East. The jet streams are caused by a combination of a planet's rotation and solar heating. They are driven by the temperature gradient; in the winter, when the gradient is steepest, jet streams are strongest.
While the oscillations of the streams are chaotic in nature, their relative positions are generally predictable to remain with certain bounds. The Northern polar jet is typically found between 7 to 12 kilometres above sea level and between latitudes 30°N and 60°N. The jet stream is said to 'follow the sun' as it moves Northward during late Spring / Summer and Southward during Autumn and Winter.
Usually this means that in Winter, the jet stream is located over or near the UK, whereas in summer the stream moves further North. When the jet stream is located over the UK, it has the effect of guiding in low pressure systems from the Atlantic leading to the strong, warm winds favoured by windsurfers and kitesurfers. Where there's wind, swell will follow. In the summer months, the jet stream tends to guide these low pressure systems away, further North, from the UK leading to calmer, drier weather.

What's going on?

It's clear from the forecast image below (2nd April 2013) that the jet stream has moved South from its usual Winter position. Cold air has been allowed to blow in from the east causing cold conditions and snow fall. Occasionally, the wind's been good for some - notably Newgale and Bigbury - but for most the temperature's been below the lower sailing limits

When will normality return?

Nobody really knows. One of the possible outcomes from global warming could be a longer term shift in the jet stream position. In the short term, the latest forecasts are showing the potential for the jet stream to move over the UK in the middle of next week, but this is still a long way out in forecasting terms.

Keep an eye on the latest forecast!

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Introducing cross.off ratings

Unlike other weather sites, our spot ratings are built by our users. We know how frustrating it can be to drive from spot to spot looking for the best conditions - cross.off simplifies your spot choice! We hope our ratings are simple to understand... Consider the rating for classic UK spot, Daymer Bay. Sailable in just about any direction, for waves Daymer Bay really in excels in South Westerly, Westerly and North Westerly. Easterlies are offshore and a South Easterly tends to be blocked by Brea Hill and is usually gusty. Scoring these wind directions from 0 to 3 results in the following chart:

Daymer Bay


For each forecast, the spot ratings are then used to show whether a spot is likely to be working or not. The grey stars show how much wind is forecast and the yellow stars translate this into specific ratings for each spot:

Help build cross.off, rate your local spots!